- provides a space devoted to the conceptual framework known as Hodges' model. Read about this resource for HEALTH, SOCIAL CARE, INFORMATICS and EDUCATION. The model can facilitate PERSON-CENTREDNESS, CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT, HOLISTIC CARE and REFLECTION. Follow the development of a new website using Drupal as I finalise my research question with part 2 starting in 2016. See our bibliography, posts since 2006 and please get in touch [@h2cm]. Welcome.

Sunday, July 25, 2010

Book: "Outcome Measurement in Mental Health" Cambridge University Press

Outcome Measurement in Mental Health
Theory and Practice
Edited by Tom Trauer
Published June 2010

In order to operate in an evidence-based fashion, mental health services rely on accurate, relevant, and systematic information. One important type of information is the nature of the problems experienced by recipients of mental health care, and how these problems change over the course of time. Outcome measurement involves the systematic, repeated assessment of aspects of health and illness, either by service providers, service recipients, or both. From outcome measurement clinicians and service recipients achieve a common language whereby they can plan treatment and track progress, team leaders and managers secure a basis to compare their services with others and to promote quality, while policy makers and funders derive evidence of effectiveness. This book will be an essential and practical resource for all members of the mental health clinical team as well as those responsible for establishing or managing services, and directing policy.

• Presents a global perspective on outcome measurement enabling readers to compare and contrast practices around the world
• Enables readers to identify the specific challenges presented in different groups and settings, the instruments to use, and how to use the results
• Emphasizes the relevance and use of outcome data to clinicians, to help them improve their effectiveness


Preface; 1. Introduction Tom Trauer; Part I. Outcome Measurement Around the World: 2. Mental health outcome measurement in Australia Jane Pirkis and Tom Callaly; 3. Outcome measures in New Zealand Graham Mellsop and Mark Smith; 4. Outcome measurement in England Mike Slade; 5. Outcome measurement in Ohio and the United States James Healy and Dee Roth; 6. The outcome questionnaire system: a practical application for mental health care settings Michael J. Lambert; 7. Outcome measurement in Italy Mirella Ruggeri; 8. Outcome measurement in Germany Sylke Andreas, Thomas Becker, Holger Schulz and Bernd Puschner; 9. Outcome measurement in mental health services in Norway Torleif Ruud; 10. Outcome measurement in Canada: one province's experience with implementation in community mental health David Smith; Part II. Outcome Measurement in Specific Groups and Settings: 11. Routine outcome measurement in child and adolescent mental health Peter Brann; 12. Outcome measurement in adult mental health services Tom Trauer; 13. Outcome measurement in older persons Rod McKay and Regina McDonald; 14. Outcome measurement with indigenous consumers Tricia Nagel and Tom Trauer; 15. Routine measurement of outcomes by Australian private hospital-based psychiatric services Allen Morris-Yates and Andrew Page; 16. Mental health outcome measurement in Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) Glen Tobias; 17. Outcome measurement in drug and alcohol services Maree Teesson and Mark Deady; Part III. Current Issues in Outcome Measurement: 18. Outcome measurement - applications and utility Tom Trauer; 19. Stakeholder perspectives in outcome measurement Tom Trauer; 20. Assessment of change in outcome measurement Tom Trauer; 21. Routine outcome measurement: perspectives on skills and training Tom Trauer and Tim Coombs; 22. A review of instruments in outcome measurement Tom Trauer; 23. Some economic and policy considerations for outcome measurement Rowena Jacobs; 24. Future directions Tom Trauer; Index.


My source:

UK Routine Clinical Outcomes Network Forum

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