- provides a space devoted to the conceptual framework known as Hodges' model. Read about this resource for HEALTH, SOCIAL CARE, INFORMATICS and EDUCATION. The model can facilitate PERSON-CENTREDNESS, CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT, HOLISTIC CARE and REFLECTION. Follow the development of a new website using Drupal as I finalise my research question with part 2 starting in 2016. See our bibliography, posts since 2006 and please get in touch [@h2cm]. Welcome.

Saturday, November 14, 2015

Student's intellectual and ethical development (Gyurko, 2011)

I desperately need to trace out a theoretical basis for Hodges' model. The paper in this post provides a piece of the jig-saw. Hodges' model is a conceptual framework that can act as a starting grid for the ongoing intellectual, ethical and professional development of all students.

In a post to follow I have also found some insights to underpin the objective and subjective within Hodges' model...

humanistic --------------------------------------- mechanistic




Perry identifies themes or stages of experience, which cluster around nine positions that are classified into four broad categories: duality, multiplicity, relativism, and commitment (Billings et al., 1998). Duality views the world dichotomously as good–bad, right–wrong, or black–white. Those who make meaning from a dichotomous point of view do so with the belief that right answers exist for everything. With regard to learning, in this stage students simply seek the right answer. With multiplicity, students learn to honor “diverse views when the answers are not yet known” (Evans et al., 1998, p. 131). As students advance toward relativism, they begin to recognize that right and wrong and good and bad are not enough to deal with the situations of real life. In this stage, students learn how to look at specific situations in an abstract view and weigh information by problem solving (Evans et al., 1998). Finally, the movement to commitment occurs when “ethical development,” involving choices, decisions, and affirmations, is incorporated in one's lifestyle (Evans et al., 1998, p.133). (p.508)

Gyurko, C. (2011) A synthesis of Vroom's model with other social theories: An application to nursing education. Nurse Education Today, 31(5), 506-510. doi:10.1016/j.nedt.2010.08.010

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