- provides a space devoted to the conceptual framework known as Hodges' model. Read about this resource for HEALTH, SOCIAL CARE, INFORMATICS and EDUCATION. The model can facilitate PERSON-CENTREDNESS, CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT, HOLISTIC CARE and REFLECTION. Follow the development of a new website using Drupal as I finalise my research question with part 2 starting in 2016. See our bibliography, posts since 2006 and please get in touch [@h2cm]. Welcome.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Agnostic qualities in Hodges' model

In the previous post I highlighted "Holistic approaches to learning are agnostic as to method." 

I added that there would be more to follow as Hodges' model can be viewed as agnostic on several levels. The following is taken from a paper on Hodges' model and its application in forensic nursing:

Hodges’ model claims to be person-centred and situated (Jones, 2008). What exactly does this mean for forensic nursing? The utility of Hodges’ model lies in it being agnostic. By ‘agnostic’ this means that the model is not dependent upon, dedicated to, sanctioned by, or owned by any particular discipline (even nursing). It was not designed with a particular media, clinical setting, situation or organization in mind. It is true, however, that the model was formulated within academia and health and social care, being taught and applied by community mental health nurses, learning disability and health visiting students. Apart from the history and universality of the model’s cruciform structure and its inherent 2 x 2 matrix form [often referred to as a Johari window (Luft and Ingham, 1955)], the model is also culturally neutral. This is an essential requirement to reflect and enact nursing values and codes of conduct (Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2008).
Doyle, M., Jones, P. (2013). Hodges’ Health Career Model and its role and potential application in forensic mental health nursing. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. 20, 7, 631-640.

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