- learn about the conceptual framework Hodges' model. A tool that can help integrate HEALTH and SOCIAL CARE, INFORMATICS and EDUCATION. The model is situated, facilitates person-centredness, integrated - holistic care and reflective practice. A new site using Drupal is an ongoing aim - the creation of a reflective workbench. Email: h2cmng @ yahoo.co.uk Welcome

Saturday, December 31, 2016

Inner model

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population




'I beseech you to take interest in these sacred domains so expressively called laboratories. Ask that there be more and that they be adorned for these are the temples of the future, wealth and well-being. It is here that humanity will grow, strengthen and improve. Here, humanity will learn to read progress and individual harmony in the works of nature, while humanity's own works are all too often those of barbarism, fanaticism and destruction.'
Louis Pasteur (1822-1895)
























Do we need more 'laboratories' in 2017?
Can we produce the researchers and other staff to fill the labs?
What labs should be prioritised?
What progress have we made in integrating knowledge since the time of Pasteur?
Does it matter?
How evidence-based is evidence-based?
Are laboratories more about analysis and hence reduction than synthesis?
Where are the social sciences exactly?

Happy New Year!

The difference that makes...

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population


So information,
while a critical part of learning,
is only one among many forces at work.


Information theory
portrays information as a change registered
 in an otherwise steady state.
It's a light flashing out on a dark hillside (to borrow an example from the philosopher Fred Dretske) or the splash of a pebble breaking the calm of a still lake.


In either case, the result,
as the anthropologist Gregory Bateson
puts it neatly, is ...


"a difference that makes a difference." p.138.



Seely Brown, J., & Duguid, P. (2000). The Social Life of Information. Boston, Massachusetts: Harvard Business School Press, 138.

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Book: Cure - A journey into the science of mind over body

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

Thunderstorm Asthma in Hodges' model

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population



Breathing, Asthma

Climate, Thunderstorms

Pollen (rupturing?)

8,500 Hospital Treatment

1,900 Emergency calls in 5 hours

Intensive Care

at least 8 Deaths



Health Services

Emergency response / resources

Disaster Management / Review



Melbourne thunderstorm asthma death toll rises to eight, The Guardian, 29 November 2016.

My source:
Davey, M. (2016). Deadly asthma thunderstorm kills four and leaves Melbourne reeling; &
Sample, I. (2016). Analysis, Doctors agree on why, but are less sure how. The Guardian, 25 November. p.3.

Friday, December 16, 2016

Time, Space and the Individual (ego)

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population










Images source:
How we think and speak

My source:
Gattis, M. (Ed.). (2001). Spatial Schemas and Abstract Thought, MIT Press: Cambridge. p.204.

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

The Space of Origin - Foucault

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population



"For us, the human body defines, by natural right, the space of origin and of distribution of disease: a space whose lines, volumes, surfaces, and routes are laid down, in accordance with a now familiar geometry, by the anatomical atlas. But this order of the solid, visible body is only one way—in all likelihood neither the first, nor the most fundamental—in which one spatializes disease. There have been, and will be, other distributions of illness. When will we be able to define the structures that determine, in the secret volume of the body, the course of allergic reactions? Has anyone ever drawn up the specific geometry of a virus diffusion in the thin layer of a segment of tissue? Is the law governing the spatialization of these phenomena to be found in a Euclidean anatomy? After all, one only has to remember that the old theory of sympathies spoke a vocabulary of correspondences, vicinities, and homologies, terms for which the perceived space of anatomy hardly offers a coherent lexicon. Every great thought in the field of pathology lays down a configuration for disease whose spatial requisites are not necessarily those of classical geometry." p.3.




"The exact superposition of the ‘body’ of the disease and the body of the sick man is no more than a historical, temporary datum." p.3.










Foucault, Michel (1973). The Birth of the Clinic. New York: Pantheon Books.

Sunday, December 11, 2016

From: Individual To: Group and ...

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population
Ken Price - Pastel (1995)










My source: Wullschlager J. (2016). Critic's Choice, Life & Arts, FT Weekend. 10-11 December, p.16.

HAUSER & WIRTH Ken Price exhibition

Image source:
http://macaulay.cuny.edu/eportfolios/artsandculture_museumsandculture/2013/07/19/ken-price-sculpture-a-retrospective/

Thursday, December 08, 2016

BBC Radio 4: "We need to talk ... "

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population

We 
(Well, there's an 'i' in humanity..?)

Need

to Talk


Ab-out




BBC Radio 4: We Need to Talk About Death

Tuesday, December 06, 2016

Book: The Great Convergence ( ...within Hodges' model)

"His [Baldwin's] framework posits three "cascading constraints" that hold back the globalisation of markets, namely the cost of moving goods, ideas and people. Initially, all were bundled together: early societies stayed where they were, passed down information to the next generation and ate what they grew. The first wave of globalisation that created the Great Divergence expanded markets via the falling cost of transporting physical goods, thanks to the steamship and the railway. ..." p.10.

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population

The cost of moving: 

IDEAS

GOODS
PEOPLE


Book: The Great Divergence



Richard Baldwin (2016). The Great Convergence: Information Technology and the New Globalization.  Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.


Beattie, A. (2016). Movement politics. FT Weekend, Life&Arts, Books. November 26-27. p.10.

Monday, December 05, 2016