Hodges' Model: Welcome to the QUAD: 2016

- learn about the conceptual framework Hodges' model. A tool that can help integrate HEALTH and SOCIAL CARE, INFORMATICS and EDUCATION. The model is situated, facilitates person-centredness, integrated - holistic care and reflective practice. A new site using Drupal is an ongoing aim - the creation of a reflective workbench. Email: h2cmng @ yahoo.co.uk Welcome

Saturday, December 31, 2016

Inner model

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population




'I beseech you to take interest in these sacred domains so expressively called laboratories. Ask that there be more and that they be adorned for these are the temples of the future, wealth and well-being. It is here that humanity will grow, strengthen and improve. Here, humanity will learn to read progress and individual harmony in the works of nature, while humanity's own works are all too often those of barbarism, fanaticism and destruction.'
Louis Pasteur (1822-1895)
























Do we need more 'laboratories' in 2017?
Can we produce the researchers and other staff to fill the labs?
What labs should be prioritised?
What progress have we made in integrating knowledge since the time of Pasteur?
Does it matter?
How evidence-based is evidence-based?
Are laboratories more about analysis and hence reduction than synthesis?
Where are the social sciences exactly?

Happy New Year!

The difference that makes...

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population


So information,
while a critical part of learning,
is only one among many forces at work.


Information theory
portrays information as a change registered
 in an otherwise steady state.
It's a light flashing out on a dark hillside (to borrow an example from the philosopher Fred Dretske) or the splash of a pebble breaking the calm of a still lake.


In either case, the result,
as the anthropologist Gregory Bateson
puts it neatly, is ...


"a difference that makes a difference." p.138.



Seely Brown, J., & Duguid, P. (2000). The Social Life of Information. Boston, Massachusetts: Harvard Business School Press, 138.

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Book: Cure - A journey into the science of mind over body

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

Thunderstorm Asthma in Hodges' model

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population



Breathing, Asthma

Climate, Thunderstorms

Pollen (rupturing?)

8,500 Hospital Treatment

1,900 Emergency calls in 5 hours

Intensive Care

at least 8 Deaths



Health Services

Emergency response / resources

Disaster Management / Review



Melbourne thunderstorm asthma death toll rises to eight, The Guardian, 29 November 2016.

My source:
Davey, M. (2016). Deadly asthma thunderstorm kills four and leaves Melbourne reeling; &
Sample, I. (2016). Analysis, Doctors agree on why, but are less sure how. The Guardian, 25 November. p.3.

Friday, December 16, 2016

Time, Space and the Individual (ego)

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population










Images source:
How we think and speak

My source:
Gattis, M. (Ed.). (2001). Spatial Schemas and Abstract Thought, MIT Press: Cambridge. p.204.

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

The Space of Origin - Foucault

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population



"For us, the human body defines, by natural right, the space of origin and of distribution of disease: a space whose lines, volumes, surfaces, and routes are laid down, in accordance with a now familiar geometry, by the anatomical atlas. But this order of the solid, visible body is only one way—in all likelihood neither the first, nor the most fundamental—in which one spatializes disease. There have been, and will be, other distributions of illness. When will we be able to define the structures that determine, in the secret volume of the body, the course of allergic reactions? Has anyone ever drawn up the specific geometry of a virus diffusion in the thin layer of a segment of tissue? Is the law governing the spatialization of these phenomena to be found in a Euclidean anatomy? After all, one only has to remember that the old theory of sympathies spoke a vocabulary of correspondences, vicinities, and homologies, terms for which the perceived space of anatomy hardly offers a coherent lexicon. Every great thought in the field of pathology lays down a configuration for disease whose spatial requisites are not necessarily those of classical geometry." p.3.




"The exact superposition of the ‘body’ of the disease and the body of the sick man is no more than a historical, temporary datum." p.3.










Foucault, Michel (1973). The Birth of the Clinic. New York: Pantheon Books.

Sunday, December 11, 2016

From: Individual To: Group and ...

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population
Ken Price - Pastel (1995)










My source: Wullschlager J. (2016). Critic's Choice, Life & Arts, FT Weekend. 10-11 December, p.16.

HAUSER & WIRTH Ken Price exhibition

Image source:
http://macaulay.cuny.edu/eportfolios/artsandculture_museumsandculture/2013/07/19/ken-price-sculpture-a-retrospective/

Thursday, December 08, 2016

BBC Radio 4: "We need to talk ... "

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population

We 
(Well, there's an 'i' in humanity..?)

Need

to Talk


Ab-out




BBC Radio 4: We Need to Talk About Death

Tuesday, December 06, 2016

Book: The Great Convergence ( ...within Hodges' model)

"His [Baldwin's] framework posits three "cascading constraints" that hold back the globalisation of markets, namely the cost of moving goods, ideas and people. Initially, all were bundled together: early societies stayed where they were, passed down information to the next generation and ate what they grew. The first wave of globalisation that created the Great Divergence expanded markets via the falling cost of transporting physical goods, thanks to the steamship and the railway. ..." p.10.

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population

The cost of moving: 

IDEAS

GOODS
PEOPLE


Book: The Great Divergence



Richard Baldwin (2016). The Great Convergence: Information Technology and the New Globalization.  Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.


Beattie, A. (2016). Movement politics. FT Weekend, Life&Arts, Books. November 26-27. p.10.

Monday, December 05, 2016

Book: In Therapy - Intra- Interpersonal

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population

In Therapy, Susie Orbach BBC Radio 4 (My source)

Book review: In Therapy - The Guardian & The Observer

Book cover: Google

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Power vectors...?

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population









...
line management
line(s?) of communication
special measures
legal directions
line(s) of command
chain of command
command hierarchy
command line
bottom line
...

Sunday, November 27, 2016

Hodges' meta-model...?

In combination the empty foreground and background brings us simultaneously to what is 'now': the situation, the context. The personal, social, political and physical are constantly re-presented in the health:ill-health duality. Our focus remains: ill-health. We still lack the depth of vision to resolve this duality. Focus needs structure: only from simplicity may we travel to complexity. 
The need for simplicity, structure, meaning and recording can be found, accomplished and apprehended through the conceptual framework known as Hodges' model. Its cruciform span is coincidental, and yet can be interpreted as four ways. Four ways of looking - seeing, learning and knowing. Five ways and even. As the model and the user reflects the innumerable perspectives that can be found as these conceptual spaces breathe: waxing and waning. Always from that initial state. Emptiness with structure.

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Individual Gravitas

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population

Trisha Brown: Man Walking Down the Side of a Building (1970)







Trisha Brown: http://www.trishabrowncompany.org/?page=view&nr=1187

My source: The Moderna Museet, Stockholm 24 August 2016.

Image source:
http://alfa-img.com/show/trisha-brown-man-walking-down.html

Sunday, November 20, 2016

Cut here and here and...

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population



..................
CUT HERE
..................


       CUT HERE        



and
CUT HERE



"Tulip Mazumdar has an uncomfortable encounter with a "cutter" and undergoes a demonstration of what really happens during FGM." BBC Radio 4.

Mazumdar, T. (2016). My quarrel with a proud FGM cutter. BBC.

My source: From Our Own Correspondent, BBC Radio 4. Neither Love Nor Money

Image: https://www.mysoti.com

Sunday, November 13, 2016

Too much Information...

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population
Perception
Stimuli
Concentration - 'Noise' - Attention
Safety - Salience - Space
Anxiety - Disposition - Mood
Sense-making
Models of Communication

TOO MUCH - information - TOO LITTLE
"How much do you have?"
Activism
Policy
Employment
Awareness
Employer Engagement
Equality
Inclusion



My source: Post and image c/o BBC Radio 4 - Digital Human

Saturday, November 12, 2016

Triangulation: c/o Roger Ballen

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population
Triangulation: (c) Roger Ballen





Triangulation: (c) Roger Ballen


© 2016 Roger Ballen

The Theatre of Apparitions

My source and original image (top):
Jackson, K. Snapshots Primitive power in black and white. The New Review, The Observer, 30 October 2016. p.5.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/oct/29/through-a-glass-darkly-roger-ballens-theatre-of-apparitions-in-pictures


Friday, November 11, 2016

Dementia & Sleep: What the Papers Say

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population

Sleep disturbance



Sleep disturbance 2




Just recently I came across a gentleman who in living with dementia and supported by his wife at home has been struggling with his sleep. Waking in the early hours 0330, 0400 in the summer is not too bad accompanied by the dawn chorus, but if it happens most days? And then in Winter: that is another matter.

Also fairly recently there are increasing instances of this man not being sure that the lady-  who is in their / his house and is taking him shopping - is his wife. She looks like my wife...? She knows what to buy and then she pays for the shopping.

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population

Who are you?

Have the doctor consider
 prescribing a sleeping tablet

"Oh OK! Hello Sandra."

Arrange a medical review

This gent is up early anyway as there is a newspaper to collect which involves a walk. The problem is he leaves too early and is then outside waiting. His wife was struggling with all this so we discussed the need for a care review by the community mental health team. A sleep diary was provided to obtain some data upon which to base decisions. While I was in the garden with Mr. my student (thanks Katie) suggested to Mrs Y that this 'imposter' be passed as a friend. This has since proved very effective at reducing anxiety, social tension and distress.

Whilst we constantly strive for truth, honesty and respecting autonomy and dignity, sometimes sadly, 'truth' is compromised. It becomes less clear when it is being cognitively undermined.

We also want to maximise independence and support what are the usual daily activities of living: collecting the newspaper included. Risks were becoming evident however. So, Mrs Y came up with a strategic decision which has seen this gentleman adjust very quickly. Sleeping in until 8 o'clock is quite a surprise for the rest of the family to hear. And for us too. It is as if the (subscription) token for the newspaper was not only sitting waiting in a pocket or wallet. It also had slot in memory, where it had to be kept on constant refresh, whirring away; of such importance that it was proving quite disruptive introducing new risks, disturbing sleep. There are still many other activities and walks to be enjoyed. Nice call Mrs Y:

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population







Cancel the newspaper

Sunday, November 06, 2016

Reply to: [HIFA] Self-care could cut need for millions of GP visits (4)

The following is a reply to a thread on HIFA - Healthcare Information For All:

Dear Lucie, Thelma and All,

The Austrian economist Joseph Schumpeter (1883-1950) defined a dynamic economy as that which is in equal parts destructive and constructive (Abbott and Ryan, 2000).

As Lucie points out in the NHS we are set-fast in ill-health delivery, curricula and workforce planning. Breaking this demand-supply is to try to stop a runaway process that has spawned many other processes: specialties, disciplines, treatments...

Policy makers repeatedly place the solution in reducing demand by eliminating - providing cures for diseases and through technology.

Innovation through technology is still sold as a (the) solution (2002.. NPfIT - currently NHS Digital). Technology has a role to play. The benefits however must be Socio-Technical.

We can readily see the connection between Schumpeter's definition and our present preoccupation with innovation and technology driven disruption?

Talk abounds of the healthcare system / market / economy being disrupted (as per HIFA and this thread!).

Innovation is often stimulated through seed funding.

In computing a runaway process may need to be 'Killed'. Clearly and despite the resultant irony, we cannot do this to our respective healthcare systems (whatever their constitution and ideology).

We cannot Kill the NHS, private and 3rd sector systems we have at present and have them newly reconfigured on 31 December 2016, 23:59:60 UTC to be primarily:

HEALTH PROMOTING, PREVENTIVE - Self-caring and with a health literate populous

Even with the addition of a leap second; this would be a leap too far.

Change of our health care systems will need to be 'seeded'.

Many small gains can be compounded, the seeds must be broadcast across the domains of Hodges' model:

  • INTRA- INTERPERSONAL
  • SOCIALLY
  • the SCIENCES
  • POLITICALLY
  • SPIRITUALLY
Abbott, J. & Ryan, T. (2000). The Unfinished Revolution: Learning, Human Behavior, Community, and Political Paradox, Stafford, UK: Network Educational Press. p.162.

Kind regards,

Peter Jones



Saturday, November 05, 2016

Looking for a Career in Finance? Why limit yourself...

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population


Know your patient


Know your patient

Know your patient
and carer

Know your clients...
and your patient


By knowing them you can help them to know themselves.

From self-knowledge to self-care when possible.

Friday, November 04, 2016

Quantum existence and experience...

"Such a picture of man in the universe is clearly presented in the language of the Wintu Indians of California. Here the primary verbal stem refers to a world, a universe, that neither exists nor does not exist. We might say that it refers to the nature of things, a nature which is not realized because the things themselves do not exist, the situations have not come to be and may never come to be. Only at the instant when man experiences these do they come into existence, into history. The experiential or existential stem of the verb is derivative from this other stem. When man speaks with the aid of this stem, he asserts existence through his own experience of it. And it is only through his doing, through, probably, his decisive act or his act of will, that the world to which the primary stem refers can have concrete existence. This dialogue between the idea of the universe or the potential of the universe, and man's experience, runs through the entire linguistic structure." p.115.
individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population






Lee, D. (1961). Autonomous Motivation. In. Anthropology and education. Series: Martin G. Brumbaugh lectures in education., Series 5. Gruber, Frederick C. (Ed.). Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 103-123.

Thursday, November 03, 2016

Fight to Power - Flight to Wonder

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population












Photo sources:

Star Party

Nazeer Al-Khatib
Freelance Photographer‎‏ based in Aleppo
#Syria Fighters from the Free Syrian Army react as they fight against the IS near #Dabiq on October 15 #AFP Photo by @NazeerAlk

My source:
Smith, H.L. (2016). Caliphate crumbles as holy village falls, The Times, 17 October, pp.34-35.

Tuesday, November 01, 2016

Empty Construction: A prelude to person-centred care

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population


My source: Financial Times
Photo source: http://www.basquecountrymagazine.com/en/street-art

Sunday, October 30, 2016

Book: The Moral Economy - Individual - Group

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population


My source: Financial Times
Cover image: Amazon

Saturday, October 29, 2016

George Monbiot & Ewan McLennan - Breaking the Spell of Loneliness

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population









My source: BBC 2 or C4?

Friday, October 28, 2016

Loneliness: across the Domains c/o BMJ

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population

isolation

loneliness

mental health

feelings  identity  meaning

motivation - behaviour

SUBJECTIVITY

physical health, coronary heart disease , stroke

mortality

longitudinal observational studies

meta-analysis

systematic review

OBJECTIVITY

social network

 family - relationships - befriending

social isolation

quality of life

family - community cohesion

social enterprise

SOCIO-

policy

social care provision

day centers

mobility - transport

volunteering

public - funding - private

economic


Valtorta, N.K., Kanaan, M., Gilbody, S., et al. (2016). Loneliness and social isolation as risk factors for coronary heart disease and stroke: systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal observational studiesHeart. Published Online First: [April 18, 2016]. doi:10.1136/heartjnl-2015-308790

My original source:
Smyth, C. Warning: loneliness as bad for your health as tobacco & Scourge of Loneliness. The Times, 20 April 2016, p.4 and 20.

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Reflection is holistic...

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population
"Reflection is holistic - it considers the whole, 

where aspects within the experience 
can only be viewed 
within the context of the whole, 


 they exist in dialectical tension, 

and cannot be reduced into parts or stages."

Johns, C. (1997). Becoming an effective practitioner through guided reflection (PhD Thesis). Open University, p.47.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Report: "Health as the pulse of the new urban agenda"



The following report published by WHO continues the themes of the previous post...

"New models of cooperation and cross-sector collaboration are needed to identify synergies across these sectors, and generate actions that result in overall gains to society, with health, environmental and economic co-benefits." p.19.

From the Executive summary:
How can policies and decisions at the city level expand opportunity for and protect the health of the 54% of humanity now living in cities? This document outlines some opportunities and basic strategies, while answering the following critical questions:  
1. Why is urban development important to health and vice versa?
2. What are examples of successful urban policies and strategies that deliver environmental, economic, social and health benefits?
3. How can decision-makers apply a “health lens” to urban planning, governance and finance, and avail themselves of tools to improve health, reduce social inequalities and ensure wider access to services and opportunity?
4. What role can the health sector play in advancing healthy, sustainable urban planning?

Editors (and image)World Health Organization
Publication dateOctober 2016
LanguagesEnglish
ISBN978 92 4 151144 5 

A Breath of Fresh Air - published

Report: A Breath of Fresh Air 

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population
Mental Pollution
advertising truth-values
ethics

mental health

anxiety  depression  fear

psychological effects of 
noise, vibration, foul air

awareness understanding
education
literacy

Vulnerable individuals:

Child
Older Adult
Person with Chronic Health Problems


Air Pollution
Definition - Measurement - Monitoring
particulates
Image: http://www.cleantheair.org/air-quality-information/particulate-matter
Transport & Fuels: Diesel, Coal
Power Stations Coal Powered

Vulnerable Population Density

Climate

Public Health Information Giving

Public amenities

Quality of Life

Housing - Parks

Health Professionals Intervention


Socio-
Change[?]

Policy  Standards  Law  Accountability

Retain Standards from EU regulations

Clean Air Zones          Clean Energy Providers

NHS Carbon Emissions

Accessibility Transport Modalities

Economics

Monday, October 17, 2016

Global Health report “Triple Impact- how developing nursing will improve health, promote gender equality and support economic growth"

Dear Colleagues

Many thanks to all of you who contributed to the compilation of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Global Health report “ Triple Impact- how developing nursing will improve health, promote gender equality and support economic growth.’

A review group of APPG members has undertaken a major review of the development of nursing globally over the last few months, holding a number of witness sessions, collecting evidence and debating our findings with the RCN, ICN and others. The report “Triple Impact – how developing nursing will improve health, promote gender equality and support economic growth” launched on the 17th October 2016 sets out a radical agenda and argues that the UK should play a major role in developing nursing globally.
Many thanks again for your time and support.

Best Wishes

Emily
Emily McMullen
Coordinator & Researcher to Lord Crisp | All Party Parliamentary Group on Global Health
Office of Lord Crisp | Fielden House | 13 Little College St | London, SW1P 3SH
Email: info AT appg-globalhealth.org.uk
Website: http://www.appg-globalhealth.org.uk


[Ms McMullen's original email edited adding text from report source]

Friday, October 14, 2016

Amazing open access Townsend Archive - Poverty in the UK materials

The Townsend archive provides open access to a range of original documents underlying the 1967/68 Poverty in the UK survey led by Peter Townsend. This survey pioneered the application of relative deprivation in measuring poverty.

The archive includes over 2500 digitised questionnaires from the survey. On these questionnaires you will find hand-written notes made, at the time of the interview, by the survey field workers. They provide telling details of the living standards and attitudes of that time. They are searchable by region, interviewer and survey booklet number.

The archive also covers a range of other papers associated with the administration and conception of the survey and notes and drafts of Townsend’s book. You can also download Townsend’s ‘Poverty in the United Kingdom’ book.

You will also find video interviews with researchers, fieldworkers and colleagues involved in, or associated with, the Poverty in the UK survey. David Donnison, Hilary Land, Adrian Sinfield, John Veit-Wilson and others reflect back on this landmark project. These interviews provide unparalleled insights into survey and research methods then and now, the relationship between social policy research and policy making across the last 45 years, and the impact, or otherwise, of research on tackling poverty.

To take a look at this fascinating resource visit: http://poverty.ac.uk/townsend-archive



Original source includes SOCIAL-POLICY AT JISCMAIL.AC.UK

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Diagnosing Corruption in Healthcare - new Transparency International publication

Dear All,

Corruption has become prevalent in healthcare to the point that it is normalised. From the politician to the patient, individuals routinely place their own private interests above public health goals and patient health outcomes. That was the conclusion from speaking to thirty public health experts and anti-corruption specialists across the globe, as part of our most recent research project.

Our earlier research had shown that those working in the healthcare sector have a low understanding of corruption. Previous attempts at providing an overview of the types of corruption in the sector, while providing an excellent resource for those dedicated to the subject, had been complex and lacked comprehensiveness. Our new publication Diagnosing Corruption in Healthcare [http://www.transparency.org.uk/publications/diagnosing-corruption-in-healthcare/], which we launched at the opening session of the World Health Summit yesterday, aims to bring all the relevant information into one space. We have produced a "map" of corruption in healthcare that contains 37 types of corruption that are clustered into eight areas in health systems.

On our new website ti-health.org you can explore the map fully. Take a look at the explanations of each type of corruption, understand better how they occur in practice by examining some case studies, and if you still want to learn more there are links to other resources on the web.

Please also note that we will be publishing an eight-episode podcast series. Each episode will cover one of the eight corruption categories identified in our research. The first episode will be published this Wednesday, providing an introduction to corruption in healthcare and exploring how corruption can occur in the high-level governance of a health system.

We hope that those working in the healthcare sector, from doctors and nurses to company compliance officers and directors, will be able to use this "map" to better understand the corruption risks in the work. We also hope this map will prompt policy makers, in the public health and anti-corruption fields, to tackle this formidable challenge that endangers health outcomes around the world.

Best wishes,

Sophie

Sophie Peresson
Director
Pharmaceuticals & Healthcare Programme
Transparency International UK

Be GREEN, keep it on the SCREEN
Healthcare. Environment. Media. Education. Business. #TransparencyMatters to us all. Tell us your story here .

HIFA profile: Sophie Peresson is Director of the Pharmaceutical & Healthcare Programme, Transparency International, UK. Email address: sophie.peresson AT transparency.org.uk

My source: HIFA: Healthcare Information For All: www.hifa.org

Monday, October 10, 2016

World Mental Health Day - Weeks, Months, Years (and Tears: or trying to find them)

Prompted by World Mental Health Day posted below are some thoughts related to each of the domains of Hodges' model in respect of mental health and health and social care in general.

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population

Reflection is an important human ability. It can be variously described as - reasoning, problem solving, introspection ... but an ability of self-reflect and critique our circumstances in a balanced, mature, objective way is an important skill that should ideally be shaped like so many others in childhood. Education and health literacy matters.

Evidence for reflection and reflective practice for nurses and other health professionals remains rather sparse and contested. There can be ethical challenges and assessment and measurement of reflection and reflective practice is problematic.

Hodges' model can support individual reflection providing a framework to facilitate person centred, integrated and holistic care. Globally there is no generic conceptual framework. Here is a candidate!

The parity of esteem debate that is so often heard in the political domain, becomes a stark fact of life to the individual in their physical and mental health. The two must be integrated.

Policy makers look to the SCIENCES domain to find the technical and analytical tools to study demographic trends and produce national statistics. 

Health providers are increasingly having to deliver services for individuals and programmes for population health. Data and Big Data all contribute through national governments to regional centers and the WHO.



Far from the binary logic of maths and the technical wonders it gives rise to, here in the SOCIOLOGICAL domain the YES or NO to having next of kin, partner, family and friends is pivotal from a mental health perspective. 

There is an irony that the size and stability of someone's social network is an indicator of their staying well; while social media can act as a force for good, or a negative force aimed at those vulnerable to bullying and abuse.

Effective communication is situated and ultimately determined by context: personal, local, glocal and global.


In this domain, whichever corner you turn to, it is politicised: be it funding for services; the word 'recovery'; the very existence and acknowledgement of mental health allied to human rights and service provision; employment and welfare; policy for access, diversity, equity, gender, equality.... mental health is manifest with political dimensions.

How are the needs of specific groups met, children, youths, women, men...?

Mental health law is crucial for personal and public safety. How this is conducted and governed is a measure of a modern state and please note the distance from the INTRA- INTERPERSONAL domain at upper left.



Thanks to @MHChat and community for reminder #WorldMentalHealthDay #WMHD16


Sunday, October 09, 2016

Queen of Katwe: Searching for a chess board

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic -------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population






(Robinson Crusoe & Friday)



#OscarsSoWhite

Group Psychology

Behavioural Economics



Queen of Katwe





My source:
Gilbey, R. (2016) Leading the race for the Oscars, Culture, The Sunday Times, pp. 6-7.

#OscarsSoWhite

Saturday, October 08, 2016

Heterodoxy in Economics and Healthcare

I may as well face it: I am tarred with the same brush that paints psychiatry, hospital and community mental health services these days (and nights). Sometimes the media, with due cause I sadly add, dispenses with the brush: the paint comes by the bucket full and is hurled.

As a product of the Victorian asylum system I am bound to be tainted. This seems to be the case when seeking feedback on Hodges' model from activists for anti-psychiatry, patient activism, engagement, self-care, carers rights and recovery. There are those who feel even the latter is a political foil that stabs at the heart and mind of those in desperate need of mental health care. The situation is exacerbated even further, such is the politicisation of healthcare and mental health in-particular since austerity cast its shadow on funding.

In seeking comment on Hodges' model this is very much about pros and cons. Hodges' model being from the 1980's is an historical artifact, but I beg to differ as to its relevance. To that audience Hodges' model is probably the antithesis of "Love at First Sight". Like the psychiatric system and the legal powers it can exercise, the model says;

"Look I can help you. Let me show you how much I care.
Don't worry. We can make sense of this.
I'll just put you and everything not just in one box but several" 
NOW COME ON GET IN THERE!

If that is the reaction then the possibilities: creative, innovative, reflective, person centred... of then blurring and erasing these lines, divisions and gathering the whole person and their situation is lost.

So, if the new wave thinking in mental health provision eschews the paraphernalia of models and framework then what is the alternative?

The question is important, vital even when we look at the mental health nursing curriculum. Curricula are never fixed in the sense that the new emerges from the old. How radical is this change?

The above reflections are prompted by an excellent piece in the FT Weekend (1-2 October) by David Pilling on the teaching of economics. I recalled a few years ago the rumpus on campus reported across the media.

Individuals and families do seek explanations, both of what ails them, their treatment and the plan of care whether enacted as self-care - a care partnership - or emergency care in the first (and vital) instance. Pilling writes about the how economics is taught, the call for broader curricula (which is underway) and the role for heterodoxy.

So I've a few questions: Where is the heterodoxy in healthcare (beyond alternative medicine/homeopathy)? Is there really no need of a generic conceptual framework in healthcare?

If the new Econocracy needs a framework then students across disciplines may also find some value in Hodges' model...

Given the cross-disciplinary pressures on healthcare systems the world-over there really is a need rethink healthcare as well as economics. Arguing in response about the economic benefits of technology is indicated and well-justified, but it is not e-nough.


individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
HUMANISTIC-------------------------------  mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group-population
"The students gathered
in response to an email ...




Philosophy


Ethics






Individual Psychology

(Robinson Crusoe)

(email...) It asked whether the economics
they were learning, dominated by
mathematical formula and abstract
models, was relevant to the real world."
"How far can economics be called
a real science?"


"Earle complains that the repeated
use of such formulaic models presents
a "closed system", immune to
external interrogation. "You are taught
a narrow way of thinking 
about the economy as this 
set of rules and laws 
not to be questioned and
 not to be engaged 
with," he says. ..."

(Robinson Crusoe & Friday)



Group Psychology

Behavioural Economics

He would like, he says,
to "put politics, and
philosophy and, well,
ethics back into economics
by teaching it as a "contested",
cross-disciplinary subject..."

"Post-Crash Economics 
has folded into
Rethinking Economics"

Post-Crash Economics Society


My source:
Pilling D. (2016). Crash and learn, Life & Arts, FT Weekend, 1-2 October, p.1-2.