Hodges' Model: Welcome to the QUAD: December 2020

- learn about the conceptual framework Hodges' model. A tool that can help integrate HEALTH and SOCIAL CARE, INFORMATICS and EDUCATION. The model is situated, facilitates person-centredness, integrated - holistic care and reflective practice. A new site using Drupal is an ongoing aim - the creation of a reflective workbench. Email: h2cmng @ yahoo.co.uk Welcome

Wednesday, December 30, 2020

Seeing red ... the colour of social progress and justice ...?

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic ----------------------------------------------- mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group



Toya Sarno Jordan / Reuters

Photograph: Toya Sarno Jordan / Reuters - Seeing red A member of a feminist collective paints the helmet of a riot police officer during a protest against gender and police violence in Mexico City. More than 1,000 Mexican women were murdered because of their gender last year, and there was also a rise in sexual harassment and assault by police.

World News, The Daily Telegraph [UK], 13 November 2020, p.17.

http://www.toyasarnojordan.com/

Photo: https://uk.reuters.com/news/picture/top-photos-of-the-day-idUKRTX898PP

The poly-pill approach to health care ...

"A "polypill" packed with four different medications to treat high blood pressure and cholesterol can cut the risk of heart attacks and strokes by up to 40 per cent when taken with aspirin, a study has suggested." 

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic ----------------------------------------------- mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group

  1. aspirin (75 mg), for thinning the blood
  2. lisinopril (10 mg), for reducing blood pressure
  3. hydrochlorothiazide (12.5 mg), also for reducing blood pressure
  4. simvastatin (20 mg), for reducing “bad” LDL cholesterol




 

Does it follow then (triage aside) that in our health and social care interventions we should not restrict ourselves to a single care domain?

 

My source: 

News: 'Polypill' with aspirin offers hope of fewer heart attacks, The Times, 14 November, 2020, p.28.

 

See also:

https://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2020/11/16/richard-smith-a-new-important-study-supports-wider-use-of-the-polypill/



Weighty matters ...

individual
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic ----------------------------------------------- mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group
 I have due regard for
my
'footprint'?


"The weight of roads, buildings and other constructed or manufactured materials is doubling roughly every 20 years, and authors of the research said it currently weighed 1.1 teratonnes (1.1 trillion tonnes)."

Our 'footprint'?

Our 'footprint'?

 

https://phys.org/news/2020-12-manmade-mass-outweighs-life-earth.html

My source: several

Global human-made mass exceeds all living biomass, Nature (2020). DOI: 10.1038/s41586-020-3010-5 , www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-3010-5


Sunday, December 27, 2020

Personal 'Felt' Service

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic ----------------------------------------------- mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group
 




 

Embroidered scan lets blind father 'see' baby. The Time, 15 December 2020, p.27.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/embroidered-scan-lets-blind-father-see-bab fathery-378jq82qb

Saturday, December 26, 2020

National Felt Service: Art - Sciences - Health

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic ----------------------------------------------- mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group

 

Gabaldoni, A. (2020) Soft Touch, The Sunday Times Magazine. 6 December, pp.48-55.

https://www.sewyoursoul.co.uk/shop/

 

Wednesday, December 23, 2020

ERCIM News No. 124 Special Theme: "PANDEMIC - Modelling & Simulation"

Dear ERCIM News reader,

ERCIM NEWS

ERCIM News No. 124 has just been published at https://ercim-news.ercim.eu/ The Special Theme of this issue focuses on research surrounding the current epidemic emergency. The contributions address actions to understand and counteract the spread of the virus. This special theme has been coordinated by our guest editors Salvatore Rinzivillo (ISTI-CNR), Joakim Sundnes (SIMULA) and Karin Rainer (AGES).

In the section "Research and Society" some of our institutes describe how they are meeting the challenges of COVID-19.

Thank you for your interest in ERCIM News. Feel free to forward this message to anyone who might be interested.

Next issue:
No. 125,  April 2021
Special Theme: "Brain-Inspired Computing"

Announcements in this issue:


Call for Proposals: Dagstuhl Seminars and Perspectives Workshops
Schloss Dagstuhl – Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik is accepting proposals for scientific seminars/workshops in all areas of computer science, in particular also in connection with other fields. https://www.dagstuhl.de/dsproposal

SAFECOMP 2021
York, UK, 7-10 September 2021
Call for Papers and Workshop Proposals

The GATEKEEPER 1st Open Call
600,000€ available for AI and Big Data Applications, tools or components


-- 
Peter Kunz                      	
ERCIM Office

Sunday, December 20, 2020

Information Overload: We live in challenging times ...

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic ----------------------------------------------- mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
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group
"Perhaps of no time is this truer than of to-day, when the mass of cheap books and papers and cinema pictures fill up every minute of leisure and leave no time for individual thought. The average man becomes incapable of knowing an original thought, or of feeling a genuine emotion. His own experience is translated into novel or cinema-language; his emotions are second-hand effects modified and devitalized by the fancies and romances of other men's minds.
The average brain like a photographic plate, covered with layer upon layer of rapid and perishable impressions; originality and reasoning power are stunted, and finally killed. Machinery likewise has destroyed the labourer's pleasure in work; he has no opportunity for the expression of his original and personal gifts. To this numbing effect of routine, with its discouragement of individuality, and hence the impossibility of joyous interest in work, can be traced ...
... the undercurrent of discontent, envy and hatred, which, uncorrected, lead along defiantly recognized channels to social upheaval ...... and revolution."

 

Savill, A. (1923) Music, Health and Character, London: John Lane The Bodley Head. pp.181-182. 

 

Tuesday, December 15, 2020

Blog, Twitter, Drupal, Reading and Writing ...

It is over a year - October 2019 - since I updated on the above

First, let's get the elephant sorted. The elephant is the 'new website'. A non-trivial task in so many ways, not just physically, but psychologically, giving rise to frustration, embarrassment but still an exciting and promising 'project'.

The IT literacy I do possess allied with conference and media engagement suggests I should give up trying to build this myself and pass the 'requirement' and 'specification' to real software developers - and stop acting the goat (is that elephant smiling?). 

Lockdown has been a great opportunity to crack-on with the website, so no excuses. Hopefully the posts over the past year can still represent learning, growth and progress.

At the start of 2020 I was hoping to do some p/t tutoring. COVID-19 upset that plan and with it planning for a pilot study and engaging with prospective partners. I am ready to pick this up, but in terms of Drupal I have to refer back to 2019...

Learning Drupal 8
At DrupalCamp London 2019 I won 'Learning Drupal 8' in a raffle. I replied to Dora who emailed the news, but don't think I thanked the company here So thank you to Inviqa and the many other sponsors who make these events possible.

Drupalcamp London: And all that jazz

I attended this year 13-15 March, pre-lockdown (obviously) and the tone was somewhat muted. Many people were unable/unwilling to travel. I felt ridiculous myself being in London (in February too) and a nurse. That feeling was magnified when pre-booked I found myself in the basement again for jazz. Like everyone at present, I miss London and so many other places. Human nature being what it is, during lockdown 1 & 2 on reflection there was a sense of relief in having run the gauntlet in February and early March.

Next year, DrupalCamp London will be online. 

Last week and last minute, I signed up for DrupalCon Europe, not in Barcelona but online. Still sorting (reducing) papers, I can see how through Drupal versions 7 to 8, the platform is focused upon 'enterprise solutions'. While I'm not an Enterprise (but would love to be a crew member), the project that is Hodges' model warrants the potential to scale.

DrupalCon Europe was a confusing experience - in a  positive sense. I missed the journey, the Basilica Santa Maria del Pi, the Guitar concerts and much more. As many of us have discovered, I was pleased to avoid the additional costs of travel and accommodation. Given this, my saying that the 250 Euros was worth it, has a less hollow ring. I missed even more the buzz of the community, which was still very much evident online. I'm looking forward to the NWDUG online meeting on the 22nd.

I know (!!) I've said this before: but I really, really need to stop blogging, tweeting and exercise this itch to the exhaustion of possibility. I've a co-authored draft to complete for submission and (two) books to read for review. So that will be an ongoing thread. Finally I will also make use of the text above.

With each abandoned (messed-up) Drupal 'dev' site, I've carried forward the legacy HTML pages that are Brian Hodges' original lecture notes. Following DrupalCon it would be progress to have more tangible outputs to carry forward, apart from being able to get to were I was much quicker. Having a content strategy is one take-away c/o the sessions that I plan to secure.

Noting the two most recent additions to the bibliography, if I can help you use Hodges' model, please let me know (I may need the distraction).

Wherever you are - take care; and for me if this is the journey - that's great too. I'd like to think there is some learning to be had here - even if not in the form of a reflective workbench.


Sunday, December 13, 2020

Two Triangles: Fire and Bubbles

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic ----------------------------------------------- mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group
O2

Fuel

Heat

Marketability of Assets

Expansionary money and credit

Intense speculation

My source:

Plender, J. (2020) Bubble, bubble, toil and trouble, Life & Arts, FT Weekend, 7-8 November. p.7.

Review of -

Levenson, T. (2020) Money for Nothing: The South Sea Bubble and the Invention of Modern Capitalism, London: Head of Zeus.

Quinn, W. Turner, J.D. (2020) Boom and Bust: A Global History of Financial Bubbles, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (This post draws upon a triangle in this book explained by Plender).

Saturday, December 12, 2020

AI: Watch your P's and Q's

individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic ----------------------------------------------- mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
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group
"How to Talk When
a Machine Is Listening:
PROCESS
PRACTICE
Corporate Disclosure
in the Age of AI" ...



... and still ensure that corporate responsibilities are achieved (surpassed), value and values - ethical and social are upheld.

Cao, Sean S. and Jiang, Wei and Yang, Baozhong and Zhang, Alan L., How to Talk When a Machine is Listening: Corporate Disclosure in the Age of AI (August 31, 2020). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3683802 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3683802

My source:

Wigglesworth, R. (2020) Robo-surveillance shifts tone of CEO earnings calls, FT Weekend, 5-6 December, p.19. 

 

The 4P's in Hodges' model:

SCIENCES: Process

INTRA- INTERPERSONAL: Purpose

SOCIOLOGY: Practice

POLITICAL: Policy

Friday, December 11, 2020

Book review: "After Ethnos" iv

After Ethnos

The nurse literature has drawn attention to transcultural nursing and ethnography in nursing theory and practice. There are books, conferences, societies, journals - papers, dedicated posts and a history derived from Madeleine Leininger's model. While tempted, I'm not about to go off-topic, suffice to emphasize the initial point about nurses being 'anthropologists' and the conceptual scope of Hodges' model.

Rees provides reassurance in this respect. As mentioned, be it lines, contours (p.41), theory, practice or concepts all play a part in avenues to disrupt, break away, escape. 

 Within this (for me) movement and moment are equivalent - leading to surprise, discovery, recognition, observation ...

"Put in a formula, the idea is to render visible ruptures and mutations of established conceptions of the human (an analysis of movement) by way of bringing into view how instances in the here and now derail and defy the normative conceptions of the human (or other things, really) that are silently transported by the analytical concepts on which anthropology thus far has relied (in terms of movement).

The form such analysis of movement / in terms of movement would take is what I refer to as exposure: the exposure of oneself, of one's analytical categories, of the established conceptions of the human that are built into these categories, in one's fieldwork/research. The task would consist in immersing oneself into scenes of everyday life in order to let the chance events that make up fieldwork/research give rise to an unanticipated, unforeseen difference." p.41

"... I mean a discovery of a space/a realm, the dynamic of which - its speed, its velocity, its logic of composition - is no longer reducible to this conceptual history, that escapes it." p.42.

I'm sorry to interpret this text in terms of Hodges' model, but I noted; "h2cm as a carrier for the 'human'". Perhaps this book can prove as pivotal and thought provoking for you?

From a health perspective I see irony in Rees's talk of new concepts and their emergence. (The book is about finding this opportunity and if not creating the opportunity?) In healthcare at present we seem to be suffering 'conceptual churn' as terminology (concepts) is called into question. Perhaps this is facet of (academic?) and the everyday life to which Rees refers. This is why and how Hodges' model can help assure 'carriage' and person-centredness that is experiential (clinically and ethnography?).

Yes, the center of Hodges' model can be a scary place too. Research in the 'open' (p.51). I'd like to think some people may find this blog and my 'take' of Hodges' model somewhat abstract if not theory-laden (I do make things more complicated than necessary). I know I need data, data, data in order to propose Hodges' model as evidence-based (with a theoretical underpinning). Rees differentiates (somewhat) between theory and theoretical and admits due to the mission to a certain disregard - disrespect for theory (p.52). This is music to the four (five -- spiritual) domains: Foucault (1972) - the echo, 'theory as a prison.'. The paradox - 'after ethnos' as a theory - is recognised too.

Rees signposted to specificity within anthropology and books on bees, insects, and cheese. This reminded me of the extracts I had heard of Sheldrake's 'Entangled Life' on fungi (roots, biomass volumes Vs human-made). I noted 'compound' but added 'compound fracture'. Philosophers may enjoy the discussion on epistemology with emphasis upon ontology. Health and medicine figures here too: public health, Pasteur, microbes, malaria (evidence back in time: the bones often have it?). Ethnoi also; what is the unit of analysis in Hodges' model (single concept, conceptual space, threshold concept, pattern, schema ...?

Rees quotes Descola (2013, xx) that includes:

"Anthropology is faced with a daunting challenge: either to disappear as an exhausted form of humanism or else to transform itself by rethinking its domain and its tools in such a way as to include in its object far more than the anthropos: ..."

 On page 65, "Latour is exemplary here. ... the distinction between nature and culture has, insofar as it runs diagonal to how the world is, ..."

Very diagonal:

 individual 
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic ----------------------------------------------- mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group
modernity (individualism...?)
nature
culture
modernity (capitalism...?)

The present to follow Latour early in the book, is reference to Michel Serres (p.85). This really warmed me. Ensembles - assemblages are clearly structures, forms to add as units of analysis in Hodges' model..

Despite my initial rock onto the back-foot, there is so much I can still draw upon here (bio-politics). Chapters 4 and 5 deserve re-reading. This is a brilliant book. Clear typology, comprehensive index. Prescient too, even though pre-COVID: with SARS and reference to avian and swine flu.

I hope to return to the notes at some point in the future.

Thank you again to Duke University Press for the review copy.
 

 
 
 

Wednesday, December 09, 2020

Action Brief: WHO COVID-19 Health Services Learning Hub (HLH)

 Online call for submissions

Thank you for your interest in contributing to an action brief for the WHO COVID-19 Health Services Learning Hub (HLH). Please find below an overview of the HLH and further information on how to submit your action brief. If you have further questions, please contact us at hlh AT who.int.

Overview

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, countries have requested urgent support from WHO to maintain their health services whilst mounting their pandemic response.
 
The WHO COVID19: Health Services Learning Hub is a dynamic new web-based platform that will allow the critical sharing of experiences and learning from innovative practices to inform the collective global response in real time. This will include action briefs on promising examples of innovation to maintain essential health services, synthesis briefs on key emerging learning needs, dynamic learning labs to solve common challenges and a ‘one stop shop’ for up to date information from WHO and partners.

 

The learning hub will be based on WHO’s Operational guidance for maintaining essential health services during an outbreak, which provides a set of targeted actions countries should take at national, regional, and local levels to reorganize and maintain access to essential quality health services for all.  

The immediate focus of the learning hub will be on maintaining essential health services during the outbreak. In the medium to longer term the hub will focus on health service recovery in the post-acute phase of the pandemic and health services strengthening in the post-pandemic phase.

Action Briefs ... continued


 

Thanks to Jagoda - HLH 

 

Tuesday, December 08, 2020

Gambling: First Team Standing

... not just the shirt on your back ...

 individual 
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic ----------------------------------------------- mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group
gambling?
gambling?
gambling?
TRANMERE F.C.


See also on W2tQ: gambling , addiction

Sunday, December 06, 2020

Book review: "After Ethnos" iii

The book has just five chapters. Given that Tobias Rees is trying disrupt, break free, escape to move beyond the established views, theory, practice - fieldwork of anthropology and ethnology critique was bound to follow. The book's response is that each chapter is followed by questions, discussion and responses the author has encountered while formulating the many ideas and arguments in the book. This is very useful structuring device and a lesson in itself (if you can engage with the academic community...).

Not dodging the inevitable questions, chapter one addresses philosophy and history, Durkheim, Mauss and the arrival of humanity, society and history are argued for in a departure for ethnos. I noted an emphasis on contingency, and 'condition of possibility'. There may be a dependency upon - with lower case philosophy and upper-case Philosophy. In 'p'hilosophy I can read a philosophy of care, a personal set of values that must be dynamic (1977 - 2020... !?) and underpins everyday practice.

If chapters four and five warrant re-reading, there are many points on philosophy end of chapter 1 that would bring (more) rewards here. In chapter 2 the history of 'humanity' as a singular collective, the concept arose some 250 years ago in Europe. An interesting conjunction then with 'data' and its impact upon what it is to be human and humanity today and tomorrow...

"Could one interpret this recentness of "the human" as an invitation for research?* ... Could one meticulously map the new, unanticipated venues for being human - for living a life - they are opening up?" p.40.

In the 21st Century we still have need of a periplus.

*Yes!

More to follow ... 

and thank you to Duke University Press for the review copy.

Saturday, December 05, 2020

"All in the Mind" (and model): Ambiguous Loss

"Have you ever lost a loved one who was still a part of your life in some way? Did it leave you feeling confused or frozen about how to continue with life? Claudia Hammond examines the distressing phenomenon known as ambiguous loss – the enormous challenge of dealing with a loss when you aren’t sure what’s happened, leaving you searching for answers, unable to move on." 
BBC Radio 4 "All in the Mind" 1st December, 2020 (Available for one year)
 individual
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INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic ----------------------------------------------- mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group

psychological ambiguous loss


ambivalence, grief, loss

guilt, reality, meaning

BOTH-AND thinking -

physical ambiguous loss


a body is missing


head injury

- the impact of dementia on a person





 

Friday, December 04, 2020

Book review: "After Ethnos" ii

COVID and the increased frequency with which the 'collective' has entered our discourse resonates for me, as this disrupts, crystallizes the INDIVIDUAL-GROUP axis of Hodges' model. It is clearer now.

There is an important take-away in: "Ethnology emerged as the "science" of the people without history.." p.9. 

There is an elephant in this book. You hear it in the distance, far away - as in anthropologically, ethnographically in fieldwork. When premoderns and moderns are discussed, colonial attitudes and beliefs of peoples far-away.

Good to see Latour p.12 and leaving the index unwrapped there was a surprise to follow. Which came first I wondered, medical sociology or medical anthropology? There are - inner-disciplinary developments. In the late 1980s - early 90s several anthropologists conducted fieldwork in "domains that were formerly believed to be beyond the scope of anthropological expertise, or interest ... medicine, science, and technology." p.11.

I related readily to Rees's scene-setting and history on the arrival of 'culture' (1770s) and how the human is conceptualized. Yes, in the age of anthropogenic climate change, would you really want to be a cultural anthropologist? p.14.

Time, really is messed up. The developed majority have opted-in to record history in carbon, not just as it has always been. The future is being written now. 

Anyone familiar with Hodges' model will understand my enthusiasm in reading of 'spaces of being', 'disciplinary significance', and the 'house of knowledge' (yes!). The key to the book overall, Rees calls for a philosophically inclined (another line?) anthropology (after ethnos). p.14.

"To be a philosophically inclined anthropologist is to orient oneself in thinking by way of thinking* - in order to find out if, and if, then in what concrete ways venues of thinking/being are coming into existence." p.16 (with ref.)
*meta-cognition?

Rees devotes chapter 3 on fieldwork, the major expeditions that helped shape anthropology and ethnography. In terms of orientation there is a stage even before the journey to the hinterlands. I have interpreted Hodges' model as a conceptual periplus, a map of the coastline of an unknown land, the foundation and (literal) framework of the house of knowledge, be that, a situation, person, family, a discipline, or culture.

Reading, you appreciate the need for anthropology to revise its intellectual toolkit. 

Yes, as an 'open situation' anthropology is situated, but then so is all humanity (and h2cm)?

 individual 
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic ----------------------------------------------- mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group
person, self, individuated
SCIENCES, TECHNOLOGY, MEDICINE

time - distance - place

people, family, other(s), myths, rituals, magic, history(?), society
a philosophically inclined anthropology
APPLY HERE!

 

More to follow ... 

and thank you to Duke University Press for the review copy.

Thursday, December 03, 2020

IFORS Developing Countries Online Resources

New documents joined - further ones are welcome

IFORS Developing Countries Online Resources 

The aim of the IFORS Developing Countries Online Resources page is to offer the OR worker all publicly-available materials on the topic of OR for Development. It also aims to provide a venue for people who are working in the area to share their completed or in-process work, learn from others, and stimulate comments and discussions on the work. Regarding IFORS Developing Countries OR resources website, its regular updates - and your possible submission of "free" (not copyright protected) material, you might occasionally visit

http://ifors.org/developing_countries/index.php?title=Main_Page

With this open resources page we aim to make research and application results better accessible to the many friends in the Developing Countries. We would be glad about interest. Contributions from the science, communication and education sectors are warmly welcome by our community which has very little access to emerging documents on arts and science, research and technology. "Operational Research" (OR) is the discipline of applying advanced analytical methods to help make better decisions. By using techniques such as problem structuring methods and mathematical modelling to analyze complex situations, Operational Research gives executives the power to make more effective decisions and build more productive systems. 

The International Federation of Operational Research Societies (IFORS; http://ifors.org/) is an almost 60-year old organization which is currently composed of 51 national societies. 

Regional Groups of IFORS are: ALIO (The Latin American Ibero Association on Operations Research), APORS (The Association of Asian-Pacific Operational Research Societies), EURO (The Association of European Operational Research Societies), NORAM (The Association of North American Operations Research Societies). 

IFORS conferences are taking place every three years. On IFORS 2021, Seoul, South Korea, August 22-27, 2021, please refer to http://www.ifors2020.kr/

Thank you very much for your attention. 

With kind regards, best wishes,

Gerhard-Wilhelm Weber 

PS: Feedback is welcome via gerhard.weber AT put.poznan.pl

My source:

www.jiscmail.ac.uk/AI-SGES 

 

Wednesday, December 02, 2020

Book review: "After Ethnos" i

A great believer in serendipity, this played a part in my discovering this book. From the FT Weekend's 'How to Spend It' I noticed the book and its cover in 'the aesthete' Anicka Yi (pp.17-18):
 
The best book I've read in the past year is After Ethnos by Tobias Rees. He's mapped out the evolutionary transformation of humans and I think it's an important book for the next stages of our species. p.17.
Looking up the book and the publisher's blurb - a request for a review copy was rewarded.

Two points, first I wondered about the meaning of  'ethnos'. A small word, it seemed to have instant gravitas. It does: being Greek for "a people" (p.1). The quote above does not mention 'anthropology' specifically, but this is very much the book's focus. Once delivered, and making a start I got a taste of what was to follow; and did wonder if I had bitten-off more than I could chew.
 
As a nurse, I thought I'm not an anthropologist, but as a member of humanity we are all in a sense anthropologists. Surely, it isn't a far stretch from 'people skills', social skills, interpersonal skills to anthropology? Perhaps, if you work in mental illness - health this connection, relatedness is accentuated? Anthropology is of course a specialist subject and the book has helped me 'place' it on the book shelf in relation to cultural studies. The view from Wigan Pier does not get you far, even if it has stretched to within 2.5 degrees of the equator and Amman, Jordan. Anthropology is fieldwork as well as a repository for theories.
 
Any qualms were quickly put aside. The book while anthropologically technical and philosophical is an easy read. The main text is 121 pages. So a couple of days and you are after ethnos too. I've still to read the notes as I passed-them-by, recording the numbers of several to look up later.

The project of the book on the DUP site includes:
In After Ethnos Tobias Rees endeavors to decouple anthropology from ethnography—and the human from society and culture—and explores the manifold possibilities of practicing a question-based rather than an answer-based anthropology that emanates from this decoupling. What emerges from Rees's provocations is a new understanding of anthropology as a philosophically and poetically inclined, fieldwork-based investigation of what it could mean to be human when the established concepts of the human on which anthropology has been built increasingly fail us.
There is much to savour here, at least in my reading. Rees refers to:

lines of thinking
lines of escape
lines of research
line of flight

A preoccupation for me is 'line(s) of sight' and insight. Much space is given to differentiating anthropology and ethnology. The role of curiosity (key for Rees) about the human and hence the difference between anthropology that is answer-based to one that is question-based.

 individual 
|
INTERPERSONAL : SCIENCES
humanistic ----------------------------------------------- mechanistic
SOCIOLOGY : POLITICAL
|
group
questions
answers
a people
the people


Clearly, the book is a challenge to classical, established, traditional views of  anthropology. What is taught, the curriculum and its future.

Rees seeks to disrupt, derail, depart and break free from what is current thinking, to seek escapes. I like reference to chaos, turbulence; the book is nonprogrammatic and all this without resort to a place at which to arrive.

In chapter 1 the sentence: Classical modern ethnology has come to an end.
 
prompted me - to substitute terms:

Classical and modern nursing (theory and practice?) has come to an end? p.8

Chapter 1 asks: what is anthropology? What is anthropology's job? What's it's domain? The book covers the history of anthropology, ethnology to facilitate a general reader's understanding.

More to follow ... 
 
and thank you to Duke University Press for the review copy.


 

After Ethnos - acknowledgements